Landing of Hubba and Hingua on the Coast of Northumbria in 866.

POPLE is so common a name in North Somerset that in only one of the county’s several registration districts – that of Axbridge, which covers the area from Burnham-On-Sea to Weston-Super-Mare – some 185 Poples are listed on the 1891 census. Among them were twelve different Elizabeth Poples and eleven William Poples. The Poples were mostly farm-workers or self-employed craftsmen of no great social standing who did not need to keep family records for inheritance purposes as did the more prosperous landed families. During the 17th century, the name acquired various spellings – Popel, Popley, Popple, Poppell are some – but our line remained Pople.

Hubba left many traces of his remarkable marches. His rapid and extensive movements across England and Wales, and his penchant for camping upon and fortifying high places, has been of great interest to archaeologists and historians. There are seven historic eminences that have borne the name of “Hubba’s Hill”.

The Ancient Arms of Pople: This Coat of Arms was taken from “Burke’s General Armory” compiled by “Sir Bernard Burke” C.B.; LL.D;, Ulster King of Arms to the Queen (1842).

HERALDIC SIGNIFICANCE FOR THE ARMS OF POPLE

ARMS:

Argent on a bend Sable between two dancette Gules three eagles displayed of the first. Confirmation of the recording of this coat of arms can be found in the 1884 edition of ‘The General Armory’ written by Sir Bernard Burke.

ARGENT:

This colour is usually depicted as white or sometimes silver. Its meaning on a coat of arms signifies Peace and Sincerity. These two attributes were highly valued even among fighting men.

BEND:

The Bend is a bearing of high honour. It represents the scarf or the device used to support a shield as used by a knight commander. It represents both Defence and Protection, two attributes required of all knights. In more recent times the Bend has been granted by the heralds for those who have distinguished themselves as commanders.

GULES:

Gules, or red, denotes Military Fortitude and Magnanimity. It is also “the martyr’s colour.”

EAGLE:

The Eagle represents Stength and Innate Power. Applied to a man of action.

MOTTO:

“We are not here for ourselves.”

POPIL'II/POPIL'II, ANCIENT ETRUSCANS dates from the Oscans (Etrusca):

The Poplar tree has its roots in ancient Rome. The name Populus refers to the practice of planting the trees near public meeting places in early Rome. The Greeks and Etruscans went on to make shields from Poplar's durable wood, though its versatility doesn't end there… Poplar wood is also prized in Italy where it is used as the base for paintings. In fact, one of the world's most treasured paintings—the Mona Lisa—was created on Poplar. The tree gets its name because it was planted in Roman meeting places.

POPIL'II/POPIL'II, ANCIENT ETRUSCANS dates from the Oscans (Etrusca)

Image Copyright:- https://lh3.ggpht.com/-392u044Jhfw/UkXgRS8YwOI/AAAAAAAAwlw/YgsQ0ROou0A/s1600/Fresque+e%CC%81trusque.png

Classical Age - Total War - Illyria - Concept Art 01

"Men of Illyrian or Thraco-Dacian origin continued to be prominent in the Empire throughout the 4th century and beyond. Our Pople J-M205 lineage could have arrived in Romano-British Somerset with a Romanised Illyrian or Thraco-Dacian (auxiliary recruit, adopting Popilius as his former owner's name as a praenomen and nomen) after 43 AD. The Western Balkans were an important source of auxiliary recruits, especially cavalry and archers to Britain (Britannia) in the mid-2nd century (with numbers reaching, by one estimate, about 200,000 men, implying about 400 regiments)."

Image Copyright:- http://i392.photobucket.com/albums/pp7/dannyboyo68/concept_art_illyria01.jpg

Distribution of haplogroup J2 (M172) in Europe, the Middle East and North Africa, Eupedia map of Y-Haplogroup J2, father lineage of J2b. (Gracile Mediterraneans)

Image Copyright:- http://www.eupedia.com/europe/Haplogroup_J2_Y-DNA.shtml

Bronze smiths turned to iron, ushering in the Iron Age from the Bronze Age. Evidence suggests this occurred first in Anatolia around between 2,000 and 1,200 B.C.E. and iron metallurgy seems to have exploded from 1,200 to 1,000 B.C.E., with evidence of bloomeries surfacing through the Middle East, Africa, Europe and Asia. By 800 B.C.E. bloomeries began to appear in China, which would eventually be abandoned by the Chinese in favor of efficient blast furnaces by the 5th Century B.C.E.

Copper Age (J2): http://www.eupedia.com/europe/map_diffusion_chalcolithic.shtml

Image Copyright:- http://www.familyleisure.com/home-improvement/patio-furniture/wrought-iron

Distribution of haplogroup J2b (M102) in Europe, the Middle East and North Africa, Eupedia map of Y-Haplogroup J2b. Thracians and Illyrians can certainly be correlated with J2b. Areas of Greek settlement also perfectly coincide with the layout of J2b. (Atlantic Mediterraneans/Dinarics)

Image Copyright:- http://www.eupedia.com/europe/Haplogroup_J2_Y-DNA.shtml

CHALCOLITHIC EUROPE (Ancient Balkans): Chalcolithic man. His most significant piece of equipment was his copper axe: not only is it the only prehistoric ax found, but it existed 1,000 years before archaeologists had thought humans had discovered copper.

"J2b has a quite different distribution from J2a. J2b seems to have a stronger association with the Chalcolithic cultures of Southeast Europe, and is particularly common in the Balkans, Central Europe and Italy, which is roughly the extent of the European Copper Age culture" Eupedia.com 2013

Image Copyright: http://smbhax.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=68&start=100

Distribution of haplogroup J2b1 (M205) in Europe, the Middle East and North Africa, Gentis.Ru map of Y-Haplogroup J2b1

Image Copyright:- http://sphotos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/580524_469131466477553_1361603844_n.jpg, Gentis.ru, 2010.

ANCIENT GREECE (Hellas):

LEUKE (or Leuce) was an Okeanid Nymph abducted by Haides to the Elysian Fields where she was transformed into a white poplar: http://www.theoi.com/Nymphe/NympheLeuke.html

Image Copyright:- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Lenoir,Charles-Amable-_A_Nymph_In_The_Forest.jpg (Lenoir, Charles-Amable - A Nymph In The Forest.jpg).

GENS POPILIA/POPILLIA/POPILLIER, ANCIENT ROME (Roma):

vi. POPLE Etymology: 'one who lived at the popple-tree' (into English as ‘poplar’, classified as Anglo-Norman from the French ‘peuplier’, from the Old French ‘pueple’, from the Latin ‘populus – a poplar tree (** see the Piazza Popolo)’, the ultimate origin is unknown; perhaps from Etruscan: compare the Ancient Greek πτελέα "elm"). In Minnesota about 1900, 'poples' was a common term for poplar trees.

GENS POPILIA/POPILLIA/POPILLIER, ANCIENT ROME (Roma):

"1777 Engraving POPILLIUS & ANTIOCHUS IV Origin of Phrase "LINE IN THE SAND" Rare". Gaius Popillius Laenas: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaius_Popillius_Laenas

Image Copyright:- http://www.ebay.com/itm/1777-Engraving-POPILLIUS-ANTIOCHUS-IV-Origin-of-Phrase-LINE-IN-THE-SAND-Rare-/251043909922

POPILLIUS/POPILIUS, ROMAN BRITAIN (Roman Y-DNA), (Latin, Plebeian):

The character of Titus "Popillius" Pullo in the HBO series “ROME” has gained a great deal of popularity with those who watched the series, not only because of his direct and reckless behaviour (murder of Cicero) and his love for women of all kinds, but also because of his verbal caprioles, his direct, plebeian tongue.

"But in the meantime the assassins were come with a band of soldiers, Herennius, a centurion, and Popillius, a tribune, whom Cicero had formerly defended when prosecuted for the murder of his father."

Popillius individuals (the forerunners of the Poples) are found all over the Roman Empire (Rome, Britannia inferior, Britannia superior, Germania superior, Macedonia and Asia etc.,).

The death of Cicero:- http://intranet.grundel.nl/thinkquest/moord_cicero_plu.html

Image Copyright:- http://www.ancientworlds.net/aw/Post/711497

POPILLIUS/POPILIUS, ROMAN BRITAIN (Roman Y-DNA), (Latin, Plebeian):

Roman Britain Military Organisation in the north (155) Based on Frere's Britannia.

Image Copyright:- http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/bd/Roman.Scotland.north.155.jpg

Figure 1: Map showing recorded locations for Aspen (Populus tremul) in Scotland plus the eight zones into which the distribution was divided.

Image Copyright:- http://www.treesforlife.org.uk/kingussie2001/aspen_variation.html

POPIL, SCOTLAND (East Lothian) 1100's - 1200's (Latin, Plebeian):

East Lothian Local Authority with Papple (Popil) town circled.

POPIL, s, A poplar. Complaynt S. Fr. peuple, Lat. popul-us, i.d

POPIL, adj. perhaps Plebeian. Teut. popel, plebs. Bellenden.

Image Copyright:- http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/Img/212683/0062497.gif

The two sets of data (etymology & genetics) are strongly linked together. The map shows how good the correlation is between Papple (Popil) - the historic town for the Popu-lus (Popillius) family during Roman times and the subsequent development of the surname over the centuries to Popley (South Yorkshire) and Pople (Somerset), "Maximum Roman Ancestry."

St. Mary's, Berrow, the ancestral church of a line of Somerset Poples. The host of this website is Kevin Pople of Bethesda, U.K. He has had great help from Christopher Pople of Bristol, U.K, who has access to several Somerset family trees, but is interested to develop further contacts. His e-mail adress was ChrisSPople@hotmail.com

Poples Well, Crewkerne, Somerset. Copyright: www1.somerset.gov.uk

Popleswell, Crewkerne, Somerset

Pople's Well, Crewkerne, Somerset (ST 435 099)

Seen 17th August 1987.

 From the information board in the town centre, turn onto the A356 and left into Abbey Street. Continue westwards, over the hill and down. On the left, beside the path and next to a field, you will find Pople's Well at the foot of the hill. The well, which it is said rises in the churchyard but is not regarded as 'Holy', consists of steps leading down to the outlet and drain into which the water drips. It was named after a prominent local family, yet was held in a superstitious awe, albeit of an undefined nature.

Text & Illustrations © James Rattue (1989)

"Horne quotes a recollection concerning a 'Beauty Spring' here;'... it was embowered amid brambles and sting-nettles... the water was reputed to bestow beauty upon those who bathed their faces therein at sunrise on the first of March.' There was also a 'Pople's Well', at the bottom of the hill on the west side of the church and, although it was not designated holy, some would not drink the water 'because it rose among the bodies in the Churchyard.' The Poples were an old Crewkerne family." -- summarised by Dom. Ethelbert Horne, 'Somerset Holy Wells' published in 1923

Designed & Maintained by Richard L. Pederick (© 1999) | Created 23/12/99

Popleswell, Crewkerne, Somerset

Popleswell, Crewkerne, Somerset

Poples End, Crewkerne, Somerset, other Pople placenames include:-

  1. Poples Bow, TA9, Burnham-On-Sea
  2. Poples Bow, TA9, Edithmead
  3. Poples Bow, TA9, Highbridge
  4. Pople's Well, TA18, Crewkerne
  5. Pople's Lane, BA11, Vobster
  6. Poples Bow, TA9, Burnham Without
  7. Poples Bow, TA9, Burnham-On-Sea and Highbridge
  8. Poples Bow, TA9, Edithmead
  9. Pople Street, Wymondham, Norfolk
  10. Pople's Lane, BA11, near Mells A no through road leading to Edney's Farm.
  11. Pople, Liberia

There are also many Pople-like locations around the world, for example:-

  1. Poples Way, Sherborne Saint John
  2. Poppell, Ravels, Belgium
  3. De Poppe, De Lutte, Netherlands
  4. Populo, Portugual
  5. Poplens Kvarter, 4330, Lejre, Denmark
  6. Popple Depot, NB, Canada
  7. Poppelweg, 78224, Singen (Hohentwiel), Konstanz, Germany
  8. Popleraweg, 1735, Giffers, Switzerland

Rebel forces at Glastonbury 1685. Copyright: tauntongarrison.org

CHARLES POPLE was among a very large number of persons transported to America, as follows:- "8 July 1685 The following convicted before Chief Justice Jefferies at the Court of Oyer and Terminer for Dorset, Somerset and Devon for waging war against the King and sentenced to be transported to the Americas [sentence enrolled on 4 February 1691]..."

An individual entry describes "1685 POPLE, CHARLES, Rebel transported 1685." (Extracted from the CD of The Complete Book of Emigrants in Bondage 1614-1775).

From the CD of Passenger and Immigration List Index, 1538-1940 (1999 Undate):- BARBARY POPLE, South Carolina 1670-1692 JAMES POPLE, " " 1670-1692 (wife Barbary) Source Code for both 248.10 CHARLES POPLE, America 1685 (mentioned three times on the Passenger List because he is referred to in three different sources). ELIZABETH POPLER (with an 'R') Virginia 1655.

The CDs are American and the Source Codes for each person appear to be contained in books in America. The Source books give more information about Passengers, i.e., where they landed, ship, etc.). With thanks to Daphne Gourlay to Ken Pople (April 29, 2000).

Indian Mutiny Medal Rolls Private James Pople, 1st Bengal European Fusiliers, wounded at Delhi on the 13th June 1857. Died of Wounds.

Image Copyright:- Sepoy mutiny of 1857. photodivision.gov.in

Name: Sydney Pople (My great-great Grandfather) Birth: 1842, Mark, Somerset Death: 9 May 1924, Liverpool, Lancs. Occupation: 1861- Coach Smith, 1881- Warehouseman, 1884- Merchant, 1891- Harbour Wharfinger, 1901- Retired Father: James Pople (1818-) Mother: Harriet (1808-) Marriage: Mar qtr. 1869, West Derby, Liverpool

Spouse: Sarah Ann Brown Birth: 25 Mar 1846, Kenilworth, Warwickshire Death: 1923, Liverpool, Lancashire Occupation: 1861- Domestic Labourer

My Pople family were either Church of England or Wesleyan (Methodists), mainly Blacksmiths in their profession in the villages of North Somerset. The father of twelve children (Rosa Emily- 1870, George Edward- 1871, Ellen Louisa- 1872, Arthur William- 1874, Frank Ernest- 1878, Martha Jane- 1879, Constance May- 1881, Sydney Herbert- 1883, Walter James- 1886, Arnold Percy- 1888 and Wilfred Eric- 1899), Sydney moved to Liverpool sometime in the 1860's as the docks and trade expanded and Bristol's fortunes declined.

Name: Frank Ernest Pople (My great Grandfather, bottom left Gentleman sitting down in the image) Rank: Private (1914-1920). Catalogue Ref: WO 372/16. Birth: 1878, Liverpool, Lancs. Death: c.1959, Liverpool, Lancs. Occupation: Cabinet Maker to Lord Knowsley, Liverpool. Served in the trenches of Northern France during WWI and served again in WWII Father: Sydney Pople (1842-1924) Mother: Sarah Ann Brown (1846-923) Marriage: Mar 1911, Prescott, Liverpool

http://neverforget.tributefunds.com/frank-pople

Spouse: Alice 'Nell' Hunter Birth: 1880 Death: n/a Occupation: n/a

Royal Flying Corps, Regiment No: 43384. Rank: Private. Lincolnshire Regiment, Regiment No: 42267. Rank: Private. Army Service Corps, Regiment No: M/410873. Rank: Private

1917 Bristol Christening of K.A.S. Pople: Top left is Henry Pople with wife Bessie in front. Leaning on chair is Nell Pople, wife of Frank Pople (1883-1946) in unifrom. At right, Kenneths mother Ethel and father Arthur Pople.

Sacred Heart Weston On Trym Bristol October 18 1941. Wedding photo of Kenneth Arthur Stone Pople (R.I.P) born Bristol November 27th 1917.

Thomas Pople Born 30th August 1843 at Mark, Somerset - Died 1894 W-S-M, Somerset.

Notable Poples:

  1. Sir John Anthony Pople: KBE, FRS, Nobel-Prize British theoretical chemist
  2. Stephen Pople: British physicist
  3. Ross Pople: New Zealand-born British conductor
  4. James Pople: British DJ producer
  5. Ian Pople: British senior language tutor, the University of Manchester
  6. Victor William Pople: British Councillor and Lord Mayor of Bristol in 1980
  7. Keith 'n Kevin Pople: American musicians with Huckleberry Groove, Michigan
  8. Ian Pople: British Neurosurgeon, North Bristol NHS Trust
  9. Rodney Pople: Australian artist

Notable Companies:

Pople Fuel Oils, Bristol Pople Pies Pople Plant Hire Pople, printer/publisher of a play by Coleridge, London.

Image Copyright:- http://bristolculture.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/park-street-bristol-blitz.jpg?w=510&h=345

Pople War Story: Bristol Blitz

Chris Pople of Bristol: chrisspople@hotmail.com his father Ken Pople was in an artillery regiment in 1940/41 which had returned without its equipment from Dunkirk and was stationed at Ellesmere in Shrophire. The German aircraft used the big lake or mere there to orient themselves for Liverpool and night after night he could hear the bombers drone overhead without being able to do anything about them. The mere was too big to camouflage with netting (there was none anyway) and attempts were made on some nights to float sawdust and brushwood on it, but it always drifted away to one end.

Chris's father was sent some nights to the city to help in the clearance, but he was relieved that on the nights he was on duty there were no air-raids.

Ken Pople's cousin Harry Pople at the time was with the Gloucestershire Regiment as part of a detachment to guard the Queen Mother, Queen Mary, who was evacuated to Badminton House near Bristol. One night he received the dreadful news that his home in Bristol had received a direct hit and hi widowed mother and younger brother were dead. His sister Elsie survived by being in a metal cage shelter under the dining-room table. He was given compassionate leave to cope with the tragedy and was later posted to India.

He doesn't have any Pople stories that go back beyond 1900, when Chris's father's father Arthur Joseph Pople (who died in 1929 when his father was eleven, so he doesn't have many stories about him either) was a young lad waiting for an apprecnticeship as a cabinet maker. He got a temporary job at a grocer's shop in Weston-super-Mare and in those days before pre-packed foods had to parcel the sugar, flour, butter etc. He learned to fold flat sheets of paper into a bag so that not a spot of sugar or flour escapes, and in later life it became one of his party tricks. He also had to wrap packets of butter for display, cheap packs for the impoverished customers, medium ones for the average customers and very expensive ones for the wealthy. They all came from the same tub! During the Great War he helped build aircraft in Bristol - wood and canvas then - and later built a splendid model of a Bristol Fighter which was unfortunately destroyed in the Second World War Blitz. He had plans to build new houses in Bristol after the Great War but became ill with TB.

Image Copyright:- http://streetsofliverpool.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/Durning-1.jpg

Pople War Story: Liverpool Blitz by my uncle, Geoff Pople

So I've decided to trip feed you the info / stories told by your Nana and Grandad Pople. First one in the series: "Near miss for cinema on Menlove Ave."

I'm trying to remember the stories in chronological order:

Your Nan had not been married long perhaps 1941? And living with in-laws. Sne and her sister Muriel had decided to go to the cinema one night (at that time George was stationed somewhere away from home and was in the Pay Core). At this time the Nazis were bombing Liverpool quite badly and it was the custom of the cinemas to announce an air raid warning with a message on the screen "Air raid in progress - film will continue to be shown but air raid shelter available, please follow signs."

However your Nan and her sister decided to stay and watch / or not to miss a good film. After about ten minutes they started to head load explosions. getting nearer and nearer to the cinema, and suddenly the film stopped and the emergency lighting went on, at the same time there was a terrible explosion and the side of the cinema buckled inwards but did not collapse. On leaving the cinema they found that the church next to the cinema had taken a direct hit and was completely destroyed.

Looks like your Nan was seconds away from taking a direct hit - if so, none of us would be here today. Perhaps?

Verify the story with your dad.

http://www.huckleberrygroove.com/

Huckleberry Groove with Keith and Kevin Pople, of the Illinois Poples.

Image Copyright:- http://a4.ec-images.myspacecdn.com/images01/50/840843f61e27e7951bcd5be6d5f93ac8/l.jpg

Birmingham - 23 June 2012 - Bushwackers - with James Pople, Image Copyright:- James Pople (DJ/Music) Facebook.

SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/#jamespople

Pople Family Of Low Ham, Somerset: Traditional & Genetic Genealogy

A history of the Pople family of Low Ham, Somerset : tracing its line of posterity from the original Unknown Pople (1500-) to the present generation and giving something of the times hundreds of years ago together with many family historic facts of local and national interest (2014)

In comparing a wide range of genealogical data, my paternal heritage is primarily from Somerset, Lancashire, Denbighshire, Montgomeryshire, Cheshire, Warwickshire, Cambridgeshire, Co. Down and Co. Antrim. On my maternal line there is a notable contribution from Anglesey, Caernarvonshire, Co. Dublin and North Yorkshire.

INTRODUCTION

Welcome to the Poplefa (Pople family association) website. In remembrance of my great Grandfather, Pvt. Frank Ernest Pople, RFC, LINC R, ASC (April 1878-March 1966) and Kenneth Arthur Stone Pople (27 November 1917-2 November 2008).

The following information is still a work-in-process, and has been pieced together from various sources since 2002. I hope it serves as an overall historical perspective on the migrations of my Pople line for future generations. My many thanks go to Jim Elliott of Scotland, Christopher and his late father Kenneth Pople of Bristol, Robert HA Sanders of Arnhem, Dave & Jo Pople of Bristol, Leonie Aspin Sands of New Zealand and Philip Clark of Somerset to name but a few.

Although this website is dedicated to my own particular father-line, much of the etymological information will be relevant for all Pople families, regardless of where they may have been dispersed through the movement of various holders of the name. Like most surnames, there are several records of the name in its various spelling forms, many alternatives will be brushed upon but others may be omitted for the sake of clarity.

Early historic spellings such as Popil, Pophull, Popeull will later prove very important concerning the derivation of the Pople name. (Harleian Manuscripts in the British Museum records the surname Pople in MS 1394, 1413, 1420 and 1487 in various folios, “The Burke’s Peerage World Book of Poples” is another good resource.

MOST LIKELY DERIVATION OF THE NAME

. Pople (Axbridge Registration District, North Somerset): Modern local spelling. (1800-)

POPLE is so common a name in North Somerset that in only one of the county’s several registration districts – that of Axbridge, which covers the area from Burnham-On-Sea to Weston-Super-Mare – some 185 Poples are listed on the 1891 census. Among them were twelve different Elizabeth Poples and eleven William Poples. The Poples were mostly farm-workers or self-employed craftsmen of no great social standing who did not need to keep family records for inheritance purposes as did the more prosperous landed families. During the 17th century, the name acquired various spellings – Popel, Popley, Popple, Poppell are some – but our line remained Pople.

By the 19th century, Pople was most common in North Somerset.

PROPOSED FAMILY TREE

. Y-DNA: M172
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. Y-DNA: M102
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. YDNA: M205
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. Y-DNA: PF7344
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. Perhaps a Roman who worked at the port at Uphill for the export of lead in AD 340. (Popilius).
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. Perhaps a follower or descendant of Ubba, also known as Hubba, Ubbe, and Ubbi.
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. Hubba’s Pill (Uphill, North Somerset). Pill is a tidal inlet, Hubba was a Viking raider in the 9th century.
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. Uppan Pylle (Uphill, North Somerset): Old English corruption of Hubba’s Pill (Uphill), meaning “above the creek” referring to the mouth of the Axe.
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. Opopille (North Somerset): Old French phonetic spelling.
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. Popil, Pophull, Popeull (North Somerset): Early local spellings.
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. Parents Unavailable.
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. 14th GGF: Unnamed Pople (Mr), b: 1500 of Somerset, England = Unnamed Pople (Mrs), b: 1500 of Somerset, England.
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. 13th GGF: William Pople (Mr), b abt.: 1520/25 of Somerset, England, d: 12 February 1571, Low Ham or High Ham, Somerset, England, bur: 12 February 1571/72 at Low Ham, Somerset, England = Unnamed Pople (Mrs), b: 1522 of Somerset, England, m: est. 1544-1576 at Curry Rivel, Somerset, England.
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. 12th GGF: Johannes (John/Johannis) Pople (Mr), b: 1545 of Curry Rivel, Somerset, England, d: 1594 at Somerset, England = Catherina (Catherine/Catharina) Taylor (Mrs), b: 1549/50 of High Ham, Somerset, England, d: 1587 at or Somerset, England m: 20 September 1570/79 at High Ham or Charlton Mackrell, Somerset, England.
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. 11th GGF: William (Ye/The Elder/Gulielmus) Pople (Mr), b: bef 25 March 1572/74 of High Ham, Somerset, England, bap: 25 March 1572 at High Ham, Somerset, England, d abt: 1610, Somerset, England, bur: 3 February 1597 at High Ham, Somerset, England = Ann (Mrs), b: , d: , m: 30 October 1589 at High Ham, Somerset, England.
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. 10th GGF: William (Ye/The Younger/Gulielmus/Guil:) Pople (Mr), b: 1625 of High Ham or Bridgwater, Somerset, England, bap: 29 Jun 1627, Bridgwater, Somerset, England, d: , = Margaret (Mrs), b: 1615 of Somerset, England, d: 16 November 1695 at Somerset, England, m: 1647 at Somerset, England.
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. 9th GGF: Johannes (John/Jo/Johan/Jn:) Pople (Mr), b: 24 April 1651 of St. Andrews, High Ham or Langport, Somerset, England, bap: 24 April 1651, High Ham, Somerset, England, d: 1687, Somerset, England = Jane (Janae/Jana) Coggan (Mrs), b: 1650 of St. Andrews, High Ham, Somerset, England, d: 1704 at Somerset, England, m: 12 February 1673 at High Ham, Somerset, England.
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. 8th GGF: Thomas (Tho:) Pople (Mr), b: 14 February 1674 of High Ham, Somerset, England, bap: 14 February 1674 at High Ham, Somerset, England, d: , = Edith Weech (Mrs), b: 1675 of High Ham or Aller, Somerset, England, d: , m: 09 October 1700 or 19 October 1706 at High Ham or Edington, Somerset, England.
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. 7th GGF: James (Ye/The Elder) Pople (early spellings: Popple, Poople, Poopple) (Mr), b: 05 November 1705 of Edington, Somerset, England, d: 1754/64 at Mark, Somerset, England, bur: 16 Jun 1754, = Jane Pople (Mrs), b. 1705 of Mark, Somerset, England, d: 1754 at Mark, Somerset, England, m: 1 March 1729 or 20 July 1724 at Mark, Somerset, England.
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. 6th GGF: Samuel (Saml/Sammuel) Pople (Mr), b: 1732 of Mark, Somerset, England, chr: 24 May 1732, d: 1793 at Mark, Somerset, England = Hannah Pool (Poole) (Mrs), b: 1728/30/32/34 of Mark, Huntspill, Minehead or East Brent, Highbridge, Somerset, England, d: 02 February 1793 at Mark, Somerset, England, m: 22 June or 12 July 1755 at Mark, Somerset, England.
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. 5th GGF: Alexander Pople (Poople) Bachelor (Mr), b: 1760 of Mark, Somerset, England, d: 1832 or April 1840 at Berrow, Somerset, England = Elizabeth (Betty) Day (Mrs), b: 1759 of Berrow, Somerset, England, bap: 14 July 1759, Somerset, England, d: August 1833 or 1836 at Burnham-On-Sea, Somerset, England, m: 15 or 25 March 1786 at Burnham-On-Sea, Somerset, England.
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. 4th GGF: William Pople (Poppel) Blacksmith, Master Blacksmith: 1841-1871 (Mr), b.cal. 1792 of Berrow, Somerset, England, d: October or 10 November 1875 at Hutton, Somerset, England = Mary Pople (Poppel) (Mrs), b: 1795/96/98 of Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, d: January 1875 at Berrow, Somerset, England, m: 1817 or 1819 at Somerset, England.
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. 3rd GGF: James (Jas) Pople (Poppel) Blacksmith (Mr), b: 1818 of Berrow, Somerset, England, bap: 11 April 1818, Blessed Virgin Mary, Berrow, Somerset, England, d: 05 May 1879 or April 1897 at Hutton, Somerset, England = Harriet Parker (nee Burrows) (Mrs), b: 1808/09 of East Brent, Somerset, England, d: April 1868 at Hutton, Somerset, England, m: 1836 at Somerset, England.
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. 2nd GGF: Sydney (Sidney) Pople Coach smith, Warehouseman, Merchant, Harbour Wharfinger, Retired (Mr), b: April 1842 of Axbridge, Somerset, England, bap: 22 June 1842 at Mark, Somerset, England, d: 1924 at Liverpool, Lancashire, England = Sarah (Srah) Ann Brown (Mrs), b: 1846 of Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England, d: 1923 at Liverpool, Lancashire, England, m: 1869 at West Derby, Liverpool, Lancashire, England.
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. GGF: Pvt. Frank Ernest Pople Pvt. No: 43384 R.F.C, No: 42267 Lincolnshire Regiment, No: M/410873 Army Service Corps, Master Cabinet Maker to Lord Knowsley, Liverpool, Retired (Mr), b: April 1878 of West-Derby, Liverpool, Lancashire, England, bap: 09 June 1878 at Everton, Lancashire, England, d: 1966 at Liverpool, Lancashire, England = Alice R (Nell) Hunter (Mrs), b: 1880 of Liverpool, Lancashire, England, d: , m: 1911 at Liverpool, Lancashire, England.
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. GF: Sgt. George Ernest Pople Sgt. No: 7667259 Royal Army Pay Corps, Retired (Mr), b: 12 October 1914 of Anfield, Liverpool, Lancashire, England, d: October 1988 at Preston, Lancashire, England = Elizabeth (Nanna) May Brown (Mrs), b: 1916 of Liverpool, Lancashire, England, d: 2002 at Preston, Lancashire, England, m: 1940 at West Derby, Liverpool, Lancashire, England.
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. F: Kenneth (Kenny) George Pople Leading Hand Engineer, MN, RN, Retired (Mr), b: 12 August 1944 of Walton, Liverpool, Lancashire, England, d: , = Elizabeth Yvonne (Non) Beattie (born Hughes) (Mrs), b: 10 October 1959 of Bangor, Caernarvonshire, Wales, d: , m. 5 April 1988 at Bangor, Gwynedd, Wales.
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. Kevin (Kevez) James Pople General Assistant, Kitchen Porter, Sales Assistant, Tele-Order Clerk (Mr), b: 19 August 1985 of Bangor, Gwynedd, Wales, chr: d: , = , m: .

Many Pople families lived in the two villages of Berrow and Brean, situated on low lying ground adjoining the Bristol Channel on the west coast of Somerset. For centuries the two villages were backward and isolated. There was a saying in Victorian times: “Berrow is out of the world and Brean a little farther.” Incidentally, the Romans had a port at Uphill (Pople) for the export of lead in A.D. 340 they erected a temple at the eastern end of the Down near the sacred site where barrows had once been etc., (read ‘The Story of Berrow and Brean’ by William St. J. Kemm).

“UPHILL

Here is a name found as Opopille in Domesday, a somewhat unusual Old French phonetic version of the Saxon or Old English uppan pyll. It was almost inevitable that the modern form should have suggested a hill, however, the original meaning could not be more different, for this refers to ‘the upper creek’.”-- Somerset Place Names by Anthony Poulton-Smith.

We may have Viking ancestors on the Pople line. The Pople ancestors have been traced all the way back to an Unknown Pople, who was born in Somerset about 1500. According to Dutch genealogists and historians, one theory proposed is that people with the surname Pople in Somerset are descended from a Viking named Ubba, also known as Hubba, Ubbe, and Ubbi, who’s father was the Viking warrior Ragnar Lodbrok or Lothbrok, son of the Swedish king Sigurd Hring, the son of Randvér or Randver, the son of Ráðbarðr the king of Garðaríki.

Garðaríki or Garðaveldi is the Old Norse term used in medieval times for the states of Kievan Rus'.

The more or less ‘standard’ POPLE version, as a surname (normally pronounced with the ‘o' long as ‘photo’, but all-too-often pronounced ‘Popple’ by those who ask their owners to spell it!), is a locality name commonly referred to ‘one who lived at the popple-tree’. This can mean that the early individual who gathered this name lived close to a popple tree or beside a forest of Poplar trees. This is provincial English for a Poplar tree, and the name Pople can be found in many ancient manuscripts in England. Similar references can be discerned in names including Oak, Ash, and Birch etc.

Today, there are references to Poples in America from the 17th century, and in the West Indies. There are families of Poples established in South Africa, Australia (where they became a musical family), New Zealand and Canada (there are a lot of Poples in the Toronto area). It might be difficult to establish a lineage for all overseas Poples, but it would be worthwhile to try.

"It’s reasonable to assume that the presence of J2b1 in Italy, Spain, France, the UK, Germany and elsewhere might be associated with Roman expansion using mercenaries and slaves acquired in the Balkans, with the unusual distinction of being re-introduced to the British Isles by Romanised Gauls as part of the Norman invasions." – Kevin Pople, 2014 (Pople Family Association).

"*My paternal ancestors were mostly farm workers or self-employed craftsmen of no great social standing. I can trace my line back to the 18th century (confirmed) and as far back as the late 1500s (conjectural). Our Y-DNA Haplogroup of J-M205 (J2b1, old J2b1b) would be considered, quite unambiguously, a potential "Roman Ancestry" DNA signature, being connected in earlier times to the Greek and Thracian Settlements in the Mediterranean basin. As a matter of fact, when confronted with the J2 haplotype by one of his British customers, even Dr. Bryan Sykes of Oxford Ancestors eventually suggested a Roman origin.*"

It is thought that J-M205 originated around the western coast of Anatolia (later becoming Hellenized). Today, this cluster has many ethnic Serbian, Croatian and Bulgarian members, with only a few Greek and Anatolian kits and zero Albanian, Kosovan or FYROM kits-to-date.

Based on the current genetic knowledge regarding ancient ethnic groups, It would be fair to hypothesize that our lineage is mainly Illyro-Thracian in Europe. Romanised Illyrians and Thracians came to dominate the officer corps, as auxiliaries’ sons achieved citizenship, they could enter the legions as citizens. Today, J-M205 has survived at a higher frequency in the ethnic-Serbian population of the Balkans.

Today, there is a notable geographical hot-spot of J-M205 families linked in historic times to Herzegovina and Montenegro. Before the arrival of the Slavonic peoples in the Balkans during the 6th century AD, these areas were inhabited principally by the bronze culture of the Illyrians.

Men of Illyrian or Thraco-Dacian origin continued to be prominent in the Empire throughout the 4th century and beyond. Our Pople J-M205 lineage could have arrived in Romano-British Somerset with a Romanised Illyrian or Thraco-Dacian (auxiliary recruit, adopting Popilius as his former owner’s name as a praenomen and nomen) after 43 AD. The Western Balkans were an important source of auxiliary recruits, especially cavalry and archers to Britain (Britannia) in the mid-2nd century (with numbers reaching, by one estimate, about 200,000 men, implying about 400 regiments).

Interestingly, the original war standards of the Thracians were “windsocks” that is, not actual flags but devices held aloft on a spear, serpentine in form, with small wings and “vestigial” limbs. The golden dragon flag was effectively England’s first national flag (see gold wyvern, red dragon, Wessex, Somerset).

ANCIENT ETRUSCA:

. Oscan (Etruscan) Gens: Popil’ii. Ancient, found among Sabine (Sabini) Italians, an Italic tribe that lived in the central Apennines of ancient Italy, also inhabiting Latium north of the Anio before the founding of Rome.

ANCIENT ROME:

Ancient Roman Gens: Popilia/Popillia/Popillier/Popilius/Popillius/Popilii Laenates. The Popilii Laenates was the name of an ancient Roman Plebs family, who lived during the era of the Roman Republic. The Popilii were known for their cruel and arrogant nature. The gens name Popilii is of Etruscan origin. (Found at Roman Macedonia, Gaul, Britannia and Germania Superior).

The most interesting of the letters are a set of five from Bustius Barbarus to his friend Pompeius. In a fragmentary one he mentions bread and a basket, in another bread and salt. However, the other three are better preserved:

*“Dear Pompeius,
Why on earth haven’t you written back to me i f you received the loaves? I sent you 15 loaves by Popilius and Dutuporis and also 15 loaves – and a ja r – by Draco, the carter . You used up four aatia . I sent you 6 loaves by Thiadices, the trooper, vho said he could take them. Please get some weights – as beautiful as possible – made for my personal use and write to me so that i n payment for them X oan make you some bread or send you the money, whichever you prefer, I want you to know that I’m getting married. As soon as I am, I’ll write to you straight away to come. Tours, HustiuB Barbarus F.S* Regards to -lius”* – Davies, R.W (1967) Peace-time routine in the Roman army, Durham thesis, Durham University. Available at Durham E-Thesis Online: http://etheses.dur.ac.uk/8075/

. “The Popilii Laenates was the name of an ancient Roman Plebs family, who lived during the era of the Roman Republic. The Popilii were known for their cruel and arrogant nature. The gens name Popilii is of Etruscan origin.” – Popillia, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

. “The genus name Popilia originates from a violent Roman clan, some of whose members were responsible for assassinating the orator Marcus Tullius Cicero, others for hounding the followers of the murdered statesman Tiberius Gracchus.” – Page 221, Coming Into Contact: Explorations in Ecocritical Theory and Practice (edited by Annie Merril Ingram).

. “It will, however, be noted that the Popilii are among the first plebeians to hold
curule offices. Cf. M. Popilius Laenas, consul 358 B.C. (Livy vii. 12. 1)"

Colwmna Miliaria of P. PopiliusLaenas, found near Hadria, on the Po. Date, 622/132.
P. Popillius C. f. \cos. |sLXXXI

Many Popillius' were slaves: Felix Popil(ii)L(ucii) s(ervus). C. I. L. x. 3790.

ROMAN GAUL:

Gallo-Roman: Populus. Ancient, found at Roman Gaul, today at Champagne-Ardenne (Top Region) and Bonnut, Aquitaine (Top City).

DUKEDOM OF NORMANDY:

Old French: Peuple. Ancient, found at France and Belgium, today at Nord-Pas-De-Calais (Top Region) and Biesheim, Alsace (Top City).

NORMAN ENGLAND:

Anglo-Norman surname: Poplar, Pople. Medieval, found at England, Netherlands, today at East Midlands (Top Region) and Ripley, East Midlands (Top City). 1066 on-wards of Normandy and England, with early records scattered in the Eastern counties (Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Huntingdonshire, Essex and Kent). Perhaps connected to Serlon de Burcy and the Normans of Burcy (Popuion?), a commune in the Calvados department in the Basse-Normandie region in northwestern France who settled in Somersetshire.

Serlon de Burcy was a Norman of the eleventh century. After the Norman conquest of England, he became a feudal baron and major landowner in south-west England. His feudal barony had as its caput and manor of Blagdon in Somersetshire He is recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086. He is thought to have originated in Burcy, Calvados. (M. de la Poupelière? or Knights Templar?)

Interestingly, the surnames Dobree and Aubrey = of Aubr(a)y or the White Poplar Grove. There is an Aubr(a)y in the Dept. of the Nord, and there are two in Normandy (Orne). (just to add to the link between Pople / Popple – Normandy – and Poplar trees).

MEDIEVAL ENGLAND (EASTERN COUNTIES), BELGIUM, FRANCE:

French and Middle English surname: Pople, Popple, Peuplier. Medieval, found at England, Belgium, France. Found as ‘Pople’ in Somersetshire, England from the late 1400's on-wards, early spellings include: Popple, Poople, Poopple, Peaple, Poaple, Popel, Popiel, Popyll, Le Peuple, De Peuple etc.

ANCESTRAL SOMERSETSHIRE:

Ancestral village: Low Ham is a village in the civil parish of of High Ham in the English county of Somersetshire. At the time of the Domesday Book Low Ham was part of the estate of Serlo de Burcy, and was later know as Ham Burcy and Nether Ham.

More on the parish of High Ham, here:- http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=15109 (An unusually large number of houses survives from the 15th and the 16th century of which three are in Henley and three in Low Ham. Check Poplar farmhouse, Henley).

Pople’s Well, Crewkerne, Somersetshire (ST 435 099) near St. Bartholomew’s Parish Church (This Church was replaced after the Norman Conquest with a larger stone cruciform building, with a central tower)

"Seen 17th August 1987. From the information board in the town centre, turn onto the A356 and left into Abbey Street. Continue westwards, over the hill and down. On the left, beside the path and next to a field, you will find Pople’s Well at the foot of the hill. The well, which it is said rises in the churchyard but is not regarded as ‘Holy’, consists of steps leading down to the outlet and drain into which the water drips. It was named after a prominent local family, yet was held in a superstitious awe, albeit of an undefined nature." – 'Some wells in the South and West – 5' by James Rattue, 1989

SOMERSETSHIRE:

. French and English surname: Today found in the New World (Aus, NZ, Ind, Can, US). Papakura District, NZ (Top Region) and Bristol Southwest, UK (Top City).

FAMOUS J-M205 POPLE’S:

. Sir John Anthony Pople, KBE FRS (31 October 1925 – 15 March 2004) was a Nobel-Prize winning theoretical chemist. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Walter Kohn in the year 1998. (*Connection = William (Ye / The Younger / Gulielmus) Pople (Mr), b: 1625 of High Ham, Somersetshire, England, bap: 29 Jun 1627, Bridgwater, Somersetshire, England, d:*).
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. Kenneth Arthur Stone Pople (27 November 1917 – 2 November 2008) was the biographer of Stanley Spencer. He served in an Artillery regiment in 1940/41 which had returned without its equipment from Dunkirk and was stationed at Ellesmere in Shropshire. (*Connection = James (Jas) Pople (Poppel) Blacksmith (Mr), b: 1818 of Berrow, Somersetshire, England, bap: 11 April 1818, Blessed Virgin Mary, Berrow, Somersetshire, England, d: 1879 or April 1897 at Hutton, Somersetshire, England*).
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.Harry Pople (Ken’s cousin) Gloucestershire regiment, as part of a detachment to guard the Queen Mother, Queen Mary, who was evacuated to Badminton House near Bristol. (*Connection = James (Jas) Pople (Poppel) Blacksmith (Mr), b: 1818 of Berrow, Somersetshire, England, bap: 11 April 1818, Blessed Virgin Mary, Berrow, Somersetshire, England, d: 1879 or April 1897 at Hutton, Somersetshire, England*).
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. James (Jim) C. S. Pople (1927 – ) Television producer and director, Jim was nominated in the 1981 British Academy Television Award for best news coverage, “80 Gracious Years.” (*Connection = William (Ye / The Younger / Gulielmus) Pople (Mr), b: 1625 of High Ham, Somersetshire, England, bap: 29 Jun 1627, Bridgwater, Somersetshire, England, d:*).

STATISTICS FOR POPLE-LIKE SURNAMES:

Surname: Peuple, Group: European_Other Western, Subgroup: French, Language: French, Top Country: France, Top Region: Nord-Pas-De-Calais, France, Top City: Biesheim, Alsace, France, Top Forename: Jean.

Surname: Peuplier, Group: , Subgroup: , Language: , Top Country: France, Top Region: Languedoc-Roussillon, France, Top City: Antibes, Provence-Alpes-Cote D’az, France, Top Forename: .

Surname: Le Peuple, Group: European_Other Western, Subgroup: French, Language: French, Top Country: United Kingdom, Top Region: South East, United Kingdom, Top City: Fareham, South East, United Kingdom, Top Forename: Samuel.

Surname: Pople, Group: European_Other Western, Subgroup: English, Language: English, Top Country: United Kingdom, Top Region: Papakura District, New Zealand, Top City: Bristol, South West, United Kingdom, Top Forename: David.

Surname: Popel, Group: European_Other Western, Subgroup: English, Language: English, Top Country: Canada, Top Region: Alberta, Canada, Top City: Bristol, South West, United Kingdom, Top Forename: Karen.

Surname: Popple, Group: European_Other Western, Subgroup: English, Language: English, Top Country: Australia, Top Region: Australian Capital Territory, Australia, Top City: Peterborough, East Anglia, United Kingdom, Top Forename: John.

Surname: Poople, Group: , Subgroup: , Language: , Top Country: United Kingdom, Top Region: South West, United Kingdom, Top City: , Top Forename: .

Surname: Peaple, Group: European_Other Western, Subgroup: English, Language: English, Top Country: United Kingdom, Top City: Swindon, South West, United Kingdom, Top Forename: Andrew.

Surname: Poplar, Group: European_Other Western, Subgroup: English, Language: English, Top Country: Canada, Top Region: Nova Scotia, Canada, Top City: Ripley, East Midlands, United Kingdom, Top Forename: David.

Surname: Popiel, Group: European_Other Eastern, Subgroup: Polish, Language: Polish, Top Country: Poland, Top Region: Lubuskie, Poland, Top City: Warszawa, Mazowieckie, Poland, Top Forename: Jan.

"…, the term “pople” (poplar-tree) was first introduced into England by Norman followers of William 1 after the Conquest of 1066, giving rise to the early medieval use of the word as a surname for someone who lived by a strand of poplar trees or a single conspicuous poplar tree. The name at its root is of Etruscan origin: “popil’ii” (Etruscan, dating from the Oscans) > “popilia/popillia/popillier” (Roman gens) > “popilius/popillius/popilii laenates” (Latin, plebeian) > “populus” (Latin) > “pueple” (Old French) > “peuplier” (French) > “poplar” (Anglo-Norman) > “pople/popple” (Middle English).

ANCIENT MESOPOTAMIA (Neolithic Anatolia & Balkans)

J2: originating in the northern portion of the Fertile Crescent (Greco-Anatolian, Mesopotamian, Caucasian). : More about J2 here: http://www.eupedia.com/europe/Haplogroup_J2_Y-DNA.shtml

CHALCOLITHIC EUROPE (southern Balkans & Anatolia)

Haplotypes represent your ancient Male ancestry/ethnicity, 5000 to 10000 yrs ago. It appears my Pople male ancestors ancient roots were from the Neolithic Greeks. This was back in the 2500 BC era, some of the closest matches in the FTDNA Haplogroup Database fall in the same areas (e.g., Greece and Italy). (** see Chalcolithic cultures, the rough extent of the European Copper Age, Eupedia.com 2013, J2b, ySearch). The highest ratio seems to fall generally in South-eastern Europe and Northern Italy (Bologna). The Pople matches are linked to Northern Italy, the Netherlands, Hungary, Slovenia, Bulgaria, Spain, Cumanians (a Turkic ethnic group in Hungary), and Germany.

Y-DNA haplotype J2b1 is now found mostly in the southern Balkans and Anatolia. Fewer than 2% of European men in the region of Europe from which my known ancestors came – the British Isles and northern Europe — belong to haplogroup J2b. It’s reasonable to assume that the presence of J2b1 in Italy, Spain, the UK and elsewhere might be associated with Roman expansion using mercenaries and slaves acquired in the Balkans.

"Many Danubian farmers would also have migrated to the Cucuteni-Tripolye towns in the Eastern Carpathians, causing a population boom and a north-eastward expansion until the Dnieper valley, bringing Y-haplogroups E-V13, J2b (Pople) and T in what is now central Ukraine. This precocious Indo-European advance westward was fairly limited, due to the absence of Bronze weapons and organised army at the time, and was indeed only possible thanks to climatic catastrophes. The Carphatian, Danubian, and Balkanic cultures were too densely populated and technologically advanced to allow for a massive migration."

Source: http://herebedragons.weebly.com/y-dna.html
J2b-Beta cluster (J M205+): http://www.j2-ydnaproject.org/j2b_beta.html
J2b – Terramare & Lutatian cultures: http://s155239215.onlinehome.us/turkic/60_Genetics/MapsOfNeolithicAndBronzeAgeMigrationsEuropeAndNearEast-Eupedia.htm

ANCIENT GREECE (Hellas)

Dorian Greeks, originating in ancient Macedonia/Epirus. Dorus, son of Hellen, founder of the Dorians. J2b: originating in Greece/S.Balkans/Anatolia (Proto-Thracian, Ancient Greek).

Underworld nymphs: Leuce (white poplar tree), lover of Hades.

In Greco-Roman mythology, Leuce or Leuka ("White" or specifically "White Poplar") was the most beautiful of the nymphs and a daughter of Oceanus. Pluto fell in love with her and abducted her to the underworld. She lived out the span of her life in his realm, and when she died, the god sought consolation by creating a suitable memorial of their love: in the Elysian Fields where the pious spend their afterlife, he brought a white tree into existence. It was this tree with which Herakles crowned himself to celebrate his return from the underworld.

LEUKE (or Leuce) was an Okeanid Nymph abducted by Haides to the Elysian Fields where she was transformed into a white poplar: http://www.theoi.com/Nymphe/NympheLeuke.html

Populus sect. Leuce, an old name for the white poplar trees and aspens, Populus section Populus: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Populus_sect._Populus

POPIL’II/POPIL’II, ANCIENT ETRUSCANS dates from the Oscans (Etrusca)

GENS POPILIA/POPILLIA/POPILLIER, ANCIENT ROME (Roma)

POPLAR TREE: The Poplar tree has its roots in ancient Rome. The name Populus refers to the practice of planting the trees near public meeting places in early Rome. The Greeks and Etruscans went on to make shields from Poplar’s durable wood, though its versatility doesn’t end there… Poplar wood is also prized in Italy where it is used as the base for paintings. In fact, one of the world’s most treasured paintings—the Mona Lisa—was created on Poplar. The tree gets its name because it was planted in Roman meeting places.

POPILLIUS/POPILIUS, ROMAN BRITAIN (Roman Y-DNA), (Latin, Plebeian)

Although J-M205 has been found in few English communities, the result isn’t altogether unexpected and it is suggestive of a genetic legacy left by a Roman conscript to Britannia or some other south eastern European.

These are areas that were overrun with and eventually settled by Barbarian nomads during the middle of the first millennium C.E. These would have included Goths, Alans and Sarmatians. J-M205 may probably have been absorbed into Scythian and Sarmatian populations and brought westward into Europe when these tribes were pushed out of Asia by the Huns. Many of their tribesmen were recruited into the Roman army, and some even served in Britain. So there is definitely a possibility that these were our Pople ancestors. But it is only a possibility. There are others, and it is impossible to determine exactly where anyone’s ancestors actually came from with 100 per cent accuracy.

“In 175, a large force of Sarmatian cavalry, consisting of 5,500 men, arrived in Britannia” and others from South-eastern Europe and the vicinity of the Black Sea.

Many Roman troops carrying J-M205 would for a certainty have been stationed on military camps in places like and all across England such as Northumberland, Lancashire, and Yorkshire in Roman times. Other sources of J-M205 in ancient Britain could be – outside the Roman auxiliary, of course – Greek slaves, Frankish settlers, Alan (Scythian) migrants, Roman civilians and any peoples of Balkan descent (Macedonians, Bulgars and Thracians).

Y-Haplogroup J-M205 (J2b1, old J2b1): Scotlands only native Poplar, the Aspen Populus tremula,the trembling poplar, is only found in large numbers in north-east Scotland (Inverclyde, Renfrewshire, East Renfrewshire), not far from the Antoine wall. Romans from Vindolanda guarded the Solway Firth, among them were the Forth Cohort of Gauls (Cohors IV Gallorum equitata), Batavians from the Rhine (ala Batavorum), Illyrian eques, Moesians, Thracians and Dacians etc., any of whom could have been J2b1.

Mythology and Folklore of the Aspen: http://www.treesforlife.org.uk/forest/mythfolk/aspen.html

More about J2b1 here: http://j2b1m205ydnaproject.carbonmade.com/projects/4900201#1

The Thracians were known for their skills as horsemen, certainly the “alae” (“wings” if cavalry) were, even the infantry among the Thracian unites were sometimes “part-mounted“ or “equitatis” (mounted).

An Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language: Illustrating …, Volume 2 by John Jamieson:

POPIL, adj.
" Within ane schort tyme eftir the confiderate kyngis with capitane Gyldo went to Forfair, in quhilk sumtyme was ane strang castel within ane loch, quhare sindry kingis of Scottis maid residence efter the proscription of the Pichtis, thocht it is now but ane popil town.” Bellend. Cron. B. iv. c. 11.
In vicum redactum, Boeth.
Perhaps mean, plebeian; Teut. popel, plebs.

PEUPLE, NORMANDY (Normandie) 900's – 1066 (Old French)

POPIL, SCOTLAND (East Lothian) 1100's – 1200's (Latin, Plebeian)

I looked up PAPPLE in G.F. Black’s book Surnames of Scotland and found the following:

Page 646: “PAPPIL, PAPPLE. From the land of Pappil near Whittinghame, East
Lothian, in old records spelled Pople and Popil, but since 1763 Pappil.
Alexander, son and heir of Johannes de Popil, granted several acres of Popil
to Gilbert de Chockeburn (Cockburn), c.1318 (James, 9; Laing, 22). Patrick,
son of Roger de Popill, gifted a toft and garden in the territory of Popill
to the Nunnery of Haddington in 1458 (RMS., II, 610).”

An etymological dictionary of the Scottish language by John Jamieson (Popil town, today’s Papple in Haddingtonshire, East Lothian):

POPIL, s, A poplar. Complaynt S.
Fr. peuple, Lat. popul-us, i.d

POPIL, adj. perhaps Plebeian.
Teut. popel, plebs. Bellenden.

From very early on the Pople family held not only their lands and estates in England but were actively allied with other influential families, clans and districts. In fact, the surname Pople is allied with the district of Caledonia, another name for Scotland. Many Scots have surnames that are not linked to any one clan; the Pople tartan (ancient, modern, reproduction and weavers colours) is listed in this section, and is suitable for any Pople with a Scottish connection.

Robert of Edrington:

A notorial instrument dated 13 May 1465 narrates:

"[this] Robert Lauder, son and apparent heir of Sir Robert Lauder of Edrington, asserted that David Lauder of Popil (East Lothian) had given sasine and heritable possession to his eldest son James Lauder and Jonete his spouse, their heirs etc., of a certain piece of land at Popil, to the prejudice of the first-mentioned Robert, who solemnly protested that the said sasine should neither be valid nor prejudice his right in the land, and for greater security, he, by throwing of earth and stone outside the house belonging to the piece of land, and by breaking a plate with his foot, broke and annulled the said sasine and so possession by James Lauder and his wife. Done at Popil at 7 a.m. on 13th May 1465 before Henry Ogil of Popil, James Ogil his eldest son, and others." – Robert Lauder of The Bass, Wikipedia.org

Black’s ‘Surnames of Scotland’ (the classic reference on this subject) further states:

PAPPIL, Papple, Popil, Popill, Pople: From the lands of Pappil near Wittingham in East Lothian (formerly Haddington), in old records spelt Pople and Popil, but since 1763, Pappil. First reference of the name was about 1318. Another in 1458 is also cited. There are also claims that the Pappil/Poples of Scotland are connected with clan McFarlane (Argyle/Lennox).

Septs are surnames that, while not having their own clan, are associated with a clan. For example, instances of the name Reid can be associated with clan Robertson. Members of the Papple family should therefore wear McFarlane tartan.

Although today listed as an English – Other, Regional; South Western (Somerset levels) surname – Pople individuals were living in Perthshire, Scotland in 1881, and today in Perth and Kinross, the city of Aberdeen and in South Lanarkshire.

Papple (Popil): http://archive.org/stream/calendaroflaingc00edin/calendaroflaingc00edin_djvu.txt

POPLEY, ENGLAND (South Yorkshire) 1200's – 1300's (Anglo-Norman, Northern)

The earliest recorded references to the name in England are Richard de Popelay who was Lord of the Manor and held estates in Moorhouse, South Yorkshire in 1285, Nicholas de Poppenhale of Sussex in 1296, William de Popelay of Yorkshire (14th century) and Thomas Popelay of Kingston upon Hull (1433).

Contents: "By William de Thornehill of Fekesby to John de Thornehill, clerk, William de Leventhorpe and Richard de Popelay of the manor of Fekesby."

Bibliography: Yorkshire Archaeological Society Yorkshire Deeds Vol. iii no 113

A Yorkshire deed in YAS V83, August the 20th 1433 mentions a Richard Popelay.

The Poples were anciently seated as Lords of the Manor at Moorhouse, South Yorkshire in the late 13th century (1200's), later branching out towards Bristol, Somerset, Lincolnshire, Hampshire, Salisbury Plain (Sarum), Wiltshire and in Dorset especially in the 13th (1200's) and 14th (*1300's) centuries. The name Pople could indeed come from either the lost place of Pophall in Linchmere, Sussex (no longer found today) or from Pophills in Salford Priors, Warwickshire or from the continent around the 15th century (1400's).

The surname also branched out to other territories and holdings, before taking the long voyage to the new world. Pople, as a surname, most experts believe it is a locality name commonly referred to 'one who lived at the popple-tree' (Latin 'populus', French 'peuplier' and thence into English as 'poplar'. This can mean that the early individual who gathered this name lived close to a popple tree or beside a forest of Poplar Trees. This is provincial English for a Poplar Tree (Halliwell), and the name Pople can be found in many ancient manuscripts in England and may belong to the oldest of all surname categories.

POPLE, ENGLAND (North Somerset) 1300's – 2010's (English, Southwestern)

John Poplay, Lord of Bristol (1500's), John de Pophull (1332), Robert Popeull (1372), William Pople (1555), Barb Pople (1558) and William Pople (1571): Somerset.

UNITED STATES

The American Connection:-

Elizabeth Pople, in 1611 of High Ham, Somerset who married Richard Sawtell in High Ham on the 5th February 1627, died in Massachussetts in 1694. I believe they left England quite soon after their marriage. If you relate this back to the Pilgrim Fathers who left England on the Mayflower in 1620, the Sawtells, nee Pople are one of the founding families of the USA.

William Pople, born in Massachusetts who fought for George Washington in the American War of Independece. There doesn’t seem to be any American Pople who has done any extensive research on American Poples.

The Pople surname has had a long and extensive history in North America since the days of the earliest English settlers in the 17th century. According to information compiled by Ancestry.com for Pople Civil War Service: There was (1) Confederate Pople and (8) Union Pople veterans.

GW Pople served time in Andersonville prison, as listed in the American Civil War Prison of Minnesota, USA.

In 1840, Pople individuals were resident of New York, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island. Pople Immigration to the US was most frequent in the 1870's, by 1880, the family had remained in the Northern states, but also branched out to Illinois, West Virginia, Iowa, Ohio, Missouri, Minnesota, Mississippi, Florida and Massachusetts. Towards the 1920s, the surname had settled Michigan, Alabama, Texas, California, Colorado, New Jersey, North Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Indiana, Wisconsin, Arkansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Idaho and Washington state.

'For God and Country Union Soldier' Digital Art by Randy Steele, Copyright: fineartamerica.com

POPLE FAMILIES

Many Pople families lived in the two villages of Berrow and Brean, situated on low lying ground adjoining the Bristol Channel on the west coast of Somerset. For centuries the two villages were backward and isolated. There was a saying in Victorian times: "Berrow is out of the world and Brean a little farther." Incidentally, the Romans had a port at Uphill (Pople) for the export of lead in A.D. 340 they erected a temple at the eastern end of the Down near the sacred site where barrows had once been etc., (read 'The Story of Berrow and Brean' by William St. J. Kemm).

The word 'pople' is sometimes used in Old French as a form of 'peuple', and some modern Americans use it for 'people'. In the 1940's a radio station in New York ran a popular soap series called We The Pople, and a book has recently been published titled 'History of the American Pople.'

1750's: The Pople kin group was diverging. The dating’s are often sombre – it is a sobering thought that a couple in those days marrying in their early twenties had an average life expectancy of only ten years together before one or other died. Parish records remind us of the tragic uncertainties of all family life then. In 1794/97 James Pople married Ann Holmes, ibid. p. 112.

There was a POPELERUM presumably a poplar wood at DONYATT in Somerset in 1300. The name has been written by various parish clerks as Popel, Poppell, Papal and Popla. In in Minnesota about 1900, ‘poples’ was a common term for poplar trees. The Middle English for a poplar was ‘poplere’ (the ‘o' as in ‘pope’) and there is 14th century evidence of its use as a by-name or surname. For example we find John de Pophull in 1332 (Somerset), Robert Popeull in 1372 (Somerset), also; Thomas Popeler, Johannes Popeler, and Wilhelmus Popler in Yorkshire, and John Poplay as a Lord of Bristol in the 1500s.

We find a Crystobelle Pople in 1526 in the Subsidy Rolls of Sussex. William Pople in 1555 of Badgworth, Somerset, whose will was proved in 1555. By the next century, the surname appears more frequently. Barb Pople of Chedzoy, Somerset in 1558, there are 20 Poples listed between the years of 1558-1600 in Boyd’s Marriage Index, English origins. William Pople in 1571 of Low Ham, Somerset.

Huguenot Pople’s were hounded out of Belgium and France to England in the 16th and 17th centuries. There is a theory that the name Pople comes from a Belgian village name. Elizabeth Pople, in 1611 of High Ham, Somerset who married Richard Sawtell in High Ham on the 5th February 1627, died in Massachusetts in 1694. I believe they left England quite soon after their marriage. If you relate this back to the Pilgrim Fathers who left England on the Mayflower in 1620, the Sawtells, nee Pople are one of the founding families of the USA.

Priestpopple on Hexham Street Map: Priestpopple (spelt Priestpople) is mentioned as the residence of the poor people maintained by the alms of the priory. It is a broad and pleasant street, at the entrance into the town from Newcastle.-- page 91. The Natural History And Antiquities of Northumberland by John Wallis, A.M Volume II.

James and Barbary (Barbara?) Pople immigrated to South Carolina in the 1670s, whilst a Charles Pople was transported to Jamaica for taking part in the Monmouth Rebellion of 1685. After serving his sentence on one of the plantations, he seems to have sailed to a North American colony. Frances Pople, daughter of William Pople was baptised at St James’s in Clerkenwell in 1690, i. 334. By the mid-17th century, Pople migrants settled in the eastern seaboard from Newfoundland, to Maine, to Virginia, the Carolinas, and to the islands.

Registration of the ancient and distinguished family name of Pople can be found in copies of “A Dictionary of English Surnames” written by P H Reaney and can be found in many Public Libraries.

(Etymology of the family name Pople can be found in Charles Wareing Bardsley, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames, Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1968, Basil Cottle, the Penguin Dictionary of Surnames, Penguin, London, 1978, Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, 1913 and Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 10th edition, 1998).

NOTABLE POPLES

. Sir Anthony John Pople KBE. FRS (1925-2004) – Nobel-Prize winning theoretical chemist , British
. Donald Pople (-) – younger brother of Sir John, British. (The Pople Scholarships)
. Ross Pople (1945-) – New Zealand-born, British conductor.
. Ken Pople (-) – Author and biographer, British. (Y-DNA J2b1 lineage)
. Ian Pople (-) – Poet, British
. Stephen Pople (-) – Physicist, published author, editor of children’s books and young adult books, British (Y-DNA J2b1 lineage)
. Dale Pople (-) – Actor and writer, American
. James Pople (-) – DJ, British
.
. William Pople (-) – Revolutionary War, American (born in Massachusetts, fought for George Washington)
.
. Frank Ernest Pople (1878-1966) – RFC WWI, British (Y-DNA J2b1 lineage)
.
.

As we know, the Pople result with Family Tree DNA (tested 6th August 2003) came back as belonging to Y-Haplogroup J-M205 (J2b1, old J2b1b) which places us in the “Roman or Mediterranean” ancestry camp. European Haplogroups are those Haplogroups which have been present in Europe between 30,000 – 7,000 years. ySearch User ID: QRHHN. These European Haplogroups are as follows:

Haplogroup E1b1b (Y-DNA) The main paternal lineage of North Africa.
Haplogroup G2a (Y-DNA) The main paternal lineage of Neolithic farmers.
Haplogroup I1 (Y-DNA) The original paternal lineage of Nordic Europe.
Haplogroup I2 (Y-DNA) Continental Europe’s Mesolithic paternal lineage.
Haplogroup J2 (Y-DNA) The Greco-Anatolian paternal lineage.
Haplogroup N1c1 (Y-DNA) The Finno-Uralic paternal lineage.
Haplogroup R1b (Y-DNA) The dominant paternal lineage in Western Europe.
Haplogroup R1a (Y-DNA) The dominant paternal lineage in Northeast Europe.

All other Haplogroups (J1, Q, T, L, C, K etc.,) are considered Non-European because of their more recent arrival (1000 – 2000 years). The Pople matches in Italy and South-eastern Europe both in the FTDNA and YHRD databases suggest an alternate origin among the peoples of the Eastern Mediterranean who dominated the world in classical times, and who traveled to Britain not just as soldiers, but as slaves, miners, traders and settlers… It is the scientific assessment that J-M205 was present in the Roman Army with Thracian cavalrymen (Bulgaria), Dacians, Dalmatians, Sarmatians.

The two sets of data (etymology and genetics) are strongly linked together. It shows how good the correlation is between Axbridge – the Top Registration district for Poples and the Military Organisation of Roman Somerset and the surrounding areas. Notice the Roman road that runs through Charterhouse on Mendip (Industrial mining of led and silver) to the Pople hotspot in the time of Aulus Plautius (43 – 37) on Frere’s ‘Britannia’ and Jones’ & Mattingly’s ‘Atlas of Roman Britain.’ Please note nearby is Caerleon (Isca Silurum, in connection with Legio II Augusta), Gloucester (Glevun), Cirencester (Corinium), Aquae Solis (Bath), Illchester and Ham Hill etc., (all Roman Military towns).

It was April of the year 43 CE. The eagles were gathering on the shores of the Mare Britannicum".

Plautius’ forces consisted of four regular legions and a large but unspecified number of auxiliaries, including substantial formations of Gaulish and Thracian (J-M205, J2b1) cavalry. Exactly how many men Plautius had at his command is conjectural, but 40,000 to 50,000 would be a reasonable guess. Besides Aulus Plautius’ own IX Legio Hispana, which had accompanied him from Pannonia, Claudius summoned from their stations on the Rhine II Augusta from Argentoratum (Strasbourg) under its commander Titus Flavius Vespasianus, XIV Gemina from Mogontiacum (Mainz) and XX Legio (the Twentieth Legion was unusual in that at that point in time it had not yet acquired any cognomina [McPake 1981: p293ff]) from Novaesium (Neuss). By withdrawing these formations from the Rhine command, Claudius may well have been killing two birds with one stone: he was both mustering an army group from positions relatively close at hand and he may also have been breaking up a potential breeding ground for insurrection. The Rhine was over-garrisoned and fairly peaceful, a recipe for disaster in the Augustan book of policy.”

http://poddimok.wordpress.com/091-britannia-capta-an-historical-essay/0302-2/

J-M205 is distributed throughout the historic territory of the Thracians, Phocaeans, Ionians (renowned for their love of philosophy, art, democracy, and pleasure; Ionian traits were most famously expressed by the Athenians) and other Greco-Balkan tribes. Auxiliary soldiers were recruited from the area of South-eastern Europe and stationed throughout England.

The distribution of Phocaean red-slipped ware in Britain etc. is most frequent in the area of England where Pople men are most frequent (when comparing the worldwide map of the imported Phocaean pottery) corresponds to the Pople hotspots, notice how the frequency of Poples drops at the Roman border and how French Poples are in the south (Aquitaine).

POPLE NAME IN HISTORY:

1837: 5 Pople children were born in England and Wales, Top Birth county: Somerset (3)
1841: 409 Pople Great Britain inhabitants, Male (209) Female (198) Unknown (2)
1874: was the most common year that Pople emigrants from the British Isles arrived in the United States. The Neckar was the most common ship that Pople emigrants sailed on
1881: Top Pople Occupations: Scholar, Domestic Servant, Labourer and Carpenter
1881: 129 Pople Great Britain households with the following individual avg. ages: Husband – 42.7, Wife – 40.1, Son – 9.9, Daughter – 9.9.7
1851 – 1901: the number of Pople inhabitants in Great Britain increased from 428 to 797 and the head of household average age decreased from 47 to 46
1901: In Great Britain 26 out of 129 Pople households (20%) were headed by women and 51.3^ of the Pople residents were female
1914 – 1918: 116 Pople soldiers received medals from the British Army Corps
1866 – 1919: The Pople life expectancy changed from 6 in 1866 to 44 in 1919
1984: In England and Wales there were 30 registered marriages where either partner has a last name of Pople
2005: There were 21 Pople births and 17 Pople deaths in England and Wales for a net gain of 4
Based on the “British Telephone Books” from 1880 to 1984, the Pople surname is ranked 6,492 out of 1,283,037 total unique surnames
Top British Isles Port of Departure for those named Pople: Liverpool, England
Most common Pople first name for these born between 1838 and 1910: William (male), Elizabeth (female)
Top three Pople births by county from 1838 to 1910: Somerset (648), Gloucestershire (255) and London (160)
Top three Pople counties by Pople population in 1841: Somerset (231), Dorset (58) and Gloucestershire (47)
Top three Pople counties by Pople birthplace in 1841: Somerset (221), Dorset (56) and Gloucestershire (26)
Top three Pople counties by Pople civil parish highest population in 1841: Moorlinch, Somerset (24), Berrow, Somerset (23) and Wedmore, Somerset (23)

… For more facts on the Pople Name in History: Pople Name in History: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Pople-History-Ancestry-co-uk-Generations-Network/dp/B001KK8F3S

CONDENSED CONNECTIONS:

i. POPLE Registration District 1891: Axbridge (** see Charterhouse, Roman military contingents, led/silver mining at the top of the Mendips, 2nd Legion, amphitheatre, salt extraction, coal & iron mining, iron smelting, pewter, glass, Aqua Solis/Glevum, Isca Dumnorum, Legio II Augusta – J2b2 and now J2b1), North Somerset

ii. POPLE Population 1836, 1841, 1861, 1891: Moorlinch, Berrow, Wedmore, North Somerset

iii. POPLE Occupations: Master Blacksmiths, Blacksmiths, Craftsmen etc. (** see Hephaestus (Latin: Vulcan) was the blacksmith of the gods in Greek and Roman mythology and the rough extent of the European Copper Age, knowledge of metals and workshops, Poplar wood used in shields?)

iv. POPLE Spellings: Popel, Popley, Popple, Poppell are some – POPLE line is North Somerset

v. POPLE Classification: English – Other, Regional: South Western: North Somerset

vi. POPLE Etymology: ‘one who lived at the popple-tree’ (into English as ‘poplar’, classified as Anglo-Norman from the French ‘peuplier’, from the Old French ‘pueple’, from the Latin ‘populus – a poplar tree (** see the Piazza Popolo)’, the ultimate origin is unknown; perhaps from Etruscan: compare the Ancient Greek πτελέα “elm”). In Minnesota about 1900, ‘poples’ was a common term for poplar trees.

vii.

viii. POPLE name: There was a POPELERUM presumably a poplar (** see Etymology) wood at DONYATT in Somerset in 1300. The name has been written by various parish clerks as Popel, Poppell, Papal and Popla. The Romans had a port at Uphill (Pophull, Pople) for the export of led in A.D. 340: North Somerset

ix. POPLE DNA: J-M205 (J2b1, old J2b1b) hotspots: Western Turkey (Ancient Greeks), Bulgaria (Thracians) and the Volga, Russia (Bulgars). In AD 1200: Byzantine Emp. and the Volga Bulgars.

ALTERNATIVE THEORIES:

. Descendants of Prince Popiel II (or Duke Popiel), a 9th century prince of Poland moved to the West and together with William the Conqueror they arrived in the British Isles. It is also possible that the Poples are descendants of one of them. Interestingly several Poples of Winnipeg were of Polish descent. Their original name had been Popiel. There were also some Popiels in Bristol; at least there was one after 1945. His name was Jan Popiel. It is likely that people having the names Popiel, Popil, Popel, Popeil, Popiels, Popiele and POPLE have common roots from the hamlet of Popiele, near Sanok in South-Eastern Poland.

. A Germanic personal name of uncertain origin and meaning, perhaps originally a nursery word. It was a hereditary given name among the counts of Henneberge and Babenberg in East Frisia, Germany between the 9th and 14th centuries.
The noted German medievalist, Charles ‘Karl’ Heinz Göller (1924-2009) in his book ‘Arthurian Studies II, The Alliterative Morte Arthure, c.1994’ on page 145: "… Bot reuaye and reuell and rawson the pople…"

. Sometime during the 19th or 20th centuries, apparently the Prewitt-Poples had a family feud, two brothers had an argument and one set became the Poples, the other the Prewitts. There is mention of a Thomas Prewitt-Pople, gentleman, born about 1743, buried 22 Dec 1782, aged 39, at St. Michaels, Bristol.

FURTHER READING:

AAAS (The American Association of the Advancement of Science), Live Science, National Geographic Magazine, FTDNA, Geneographic Project – Geno 2.0, Anatolian Archeology, Minoan Civilization, Mesopotamian Civilization, International High IQ Society, Genetic Genealogy, Bet-Nahrain Democratic Party, Romeinenfestival, Matt Lauer, Cultural Anthropology of Haplogroup J2, Julius Caesar, Ancient Greece, Alexander the Great, Kalash People’s Development Fund, Dacians, Assyrians.

LINKS:

Etymology: http://www.4crests.com/pople-coat-of-arms.html
World Family Names: http://worldnames.publicprofiler.org/
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/YDNAHaplogroupJ2
Eupedia: http://www.eupedia.com/europe/Haplogroup_J2_Y-DNA.shtml
Directories: http://www.historicaldirectories.org/hd/b1.asp
LDS Search: https://www.familysearch.org/search/records/results#count=20&query=%2Bsurname%3APople
Pople Tartan: http://www.scotweb.co.uk/tartan/Pople/59987
CWGC: http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead.aspx?cpage=1
Pople Family Genealogy Forum: http://genforum.genealogy.com/pople/
Surname Distribution: https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Surname_Distribution_Maps
Wiktionary for Pople (Anglo-Norman): http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pople#Anglo-Norman
Huckleberry Groove: http://www.huckleberrygroove.com/
Private. Frank E. Pople: http://neverforget.tributefunds.com/frank-pople
King Popiel: http://kingpopiel.tripod.com/english/frames1.htm
J-M205: http://www.j2-ydnaproject.org/j2b_beta.html
Tristan (Sarmatian Knight): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQ_75ojWgaM
A song for the Scottish Poples: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5626WzsfMw
Taliban and the Kalash (J2b1 people): http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/6214794/Taliban-targets-descendants-of-Alexander-the-Great.html
Nova Roma: http://www.novaroma.org/
Creation Science, Haplogroup J (Aram): http://creationwiki.org/Aram
Sumerian links to DNA: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rEk_bYaPPBQ
Family Tree DNA: http://www.familytreedna.com/
Ancestry.co.uk: http://www.ancestry.co.uk/
HBO Rome: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqzDrFX-cNs
GENTIS J2b1: http://gentis.ru/info/ydna-tutorial/hg-j/m205
Pople (Anglo-Saxon): http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gallgaedhil/border_reiver_deep_ancestry.htm

ADDITIONAL LINKS:

http://www.britishsurnames.co.uk/surnames/POPLE/1881census
http://www.2020site.org/trees/poplar.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Roman.Britain.Mining.jpg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Pople
http://www.youtube.com/user/YDNAHaplogroupJM205
http://www.familytreedna.com/public/J2%20Y%20DNA%20group
http://www.2020site.org/trees/poplar.html
http://whisperingbooks.com/Show_Page/?book=Classic_Greek_And_Roman_Myths&story=Poplar_Tree
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Roman.Britain.Mining.jpg
http://www.britannia.com/history/somerset/somhist3.html
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JDQ7-GM1
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leuce
http://www.haaretz.com/news/features/man-s-surname-can-be-guessed-through-dna-israeli-researchers-discover.premium-1.495100
http://www.poplartree.org/poplar-tree-history/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piazza_del_Popolo
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D_5ejCY_EWI
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bessi
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/6214794/Taliban-targets-descendants-of-Alexander-the-Great.html
http://worldnames.publicprofiler.org/

POPLE } (Teut.-Lat.) Dweller by a POPPLE-
POPPLE } or POPLAR-TREE [M.E. popyl (-tre),
O.E. popel-, popul- = Scand. poppel ; Lat.
popul-us, the poplar] – Page 86, "Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary By Henry Harrison."

POPLETT } Dweller at the POPLAR – HEAD
POPPLEWELL } Dweller at the POPLAR – SPRING
POPPLETON } the POPLAR ENCLOSURE or FARM
DOBREE / AUBREY } Dweller at a WHITE-POPLAR GROVE

Copyright © 2013, Mr Kevin Pople, Dip, BA (Hons), ISOGG, RVS, MVS
Pople Family Association, a website for the Poples
Admin for the Y-M205 Channel, YouTube: www.youtube.com/user/YDNAHaplogroupJM205

Role
Project Administrator
For
A website for all the Poples
Type
Genealogical, Genetics, Family History Website
URL
www.poplefa.carbonmade.com/